Tuesday, September 29, 2015

Healthcare Hazards and OSHA Safety

What are the risks?


Healthcare is involved, directly or indirectly, with the provision of health services to individuals. These services can occur in a variety of work settings, including hospitals, clinics, dental offices, out-patient surgery centers, birthing centers, emergency medical care, home healthcare, and nursing homes.  


By it's very nature, the realm of healthcare is full or risks and potential dangers.  All healthcare workers need to be adequately trained in these hazards and the mitigation of risk to themselves, other staff members, their patients and visitors.


What types of hazards do workers face?



Healthcare workers face a number of serious safety and health hazards. They include bloodborne pathogens and biological hazards, potential chemical and drug exposures, waste anesthetic gas exposures, respiratory hazards, ergonomic hazards from lifting and repetitive tasks, laser hazards, workplace violence, hazards associated with laboratories, and radioactive material and x-ray hazards. Some of the potential chemical exposures include formaldehyde, used for preservation of specimens for pathology; ethylene oxide, glutaraldehyde, and paracetic acid used for sterilization; and numerous other chemicals used in healthcare laboratories.


How many workers get sick or injured?



More workers are injured in the healthcare and social assistance industry sector than any other. This industry has one of the highest rates of work related injuries and illnesses. In 2010, the healthcare and social assistance industry reported more injury and illness cases than any other private industry sector -- 653,900 cases (Table 2 (PDF)). That is 152,000 more cases than the next industry sector: manufacturing. In 2010, the incidence rate for work related nonfatal injuries and illnesses in health care and social assistance was 139.9; the incidence rate for nonfatal injury and illnesses in all private industry was 107.7.

Nursing aides, orderlies, and attendants had the highest rates of musculoskeletal disorders of all occupations in 2010. The incidence rate of work related musculoskeletal disorders for these occupations was 249 per 10,000 workers. This compares to the average rate for all workers in 2010 of 34.


Hospitals have serious hazards—lifting and moving patients, needlesticks, slips, trips, and falls, and the potential for agitated or combative patients or visitors—along with a dynamic, unpredictable environment and a unique culture. Caregivers feel an ethical duty to "do no harm" to patients, and some will even put their own safety and health at risk to help a patient.

Other than doctors and nurses, what workers are exposed?



In addition to the medical staff, large healthcare facilities employ a wide variety of trades that have health and safety hazards associated with them. These include mechanical maintenance, medical equipment maintenance, housekeeping, food service, building and grounds maintenance, laundry, and administrative staff.
  

Understanding the Risks


Hospital work can be surprisingly dangerous.

 

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the likelihood of injury or illness resulting in days away from work is higher in hospitals than in construction and manufacturing—two industries that are traditionally thought to be relatively hazardous.

Injuries and illnesses come at a high cost. 


When an employee gets hurt on the job, medical facilities pay the price in many ways, including: Workers' compensation for lost wages and medical costs; temporary staffing, backfilling, and overtime when injured employees miss work; turnover costs when an injured employee quits; and decreased productivity and morale as employees become physically and emotionally fatigued.


Workplace safety also affects patient care.

Manual lifting can injure caregivers and also put patients at risk of falls, fractures, bruises, and skin tears. Caregiver fatigue, injury, and stress are tied to a higher risk of medication errors and patient infections.


Healthcare is a busy world; full of regulations and sometimes OSHA training is that last thing to receive attention. The risks of the personal hazards and potential OSHA fines or lawsuits are too prevalent to let this required training fall by the way side.  Make sure your entire staff is training in OSHA compliance annually.  Develop and implement your safety plan as a regular part of daily practice.

https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/healthcarefacilities 


For more information on providing your office with OSHA compliance training or additional HIPAA, OSHA, Medicare and HR resources, please visit our web site: http://www.hcsiinc.com or email support at support@hcsiinc.com.