Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Walking the Social Media Tightrope

Much like walking on a tightrope, participating on social media is a science as well as an art.


People post on social media all the time. They like to post pictures, tag their location when they are somewhere cool and they even like to write about what they are eating. Unfortunately, many people do not see any harm in what they post. For example, below is an example of somebody posting something that they perceived as innocent and, in their eyes, thoughtful:

In an assisted living center, a housekeeper posted a picture of a vision and hearing impaired resident on her social networking webpage, with the caption "This is my friend," along with the resident's first name.

By posting the picture of the resident without their consent, the employee violated HIPAA Privacy regulations. After the violation was brought to the employees’ attention, the employee apologized and immediately removed the photo. She said she was not aware that a person could not do such a thing without the resident's consent. While the employee did not have malicious intent, the action was still a violation of the resident’s privacy.

Social media is a double edged sword. If used properly, social media can be an amazing tool that can be used in many beneficial ways. However, if used improperly, social media can do extensive damage to the user and the organization they work for.

Dangers of Social Media

Use of social media by healthcare professionals can present some challenges and possibly open the door to HIPAA Privacy violation and future liability. Here are some examples of social media privacy violations that have lead to a HIPAA Privacy audit:

  • Posting pictures of patients/residents without their consent
  • Posting a video of a patient
  • Posting a video describing a patient or a patients situation
  • Posting a “selfie” in a restricted area where Protected Health Information (PHI) is visible
  • Writing a post or comment about a patients situation

These social media posts can severely damaging to an organization and to the individual who’s privacy had been compromised. In addition to these actions leading to a HIPAA Privacy audit, these type of social media posts also have a negative effect on the reputation of the healthcare organization. Privacy violations do not go unnoticed by other patients and these privacy violations do cause patients to rethink their trust in their healthcare provider.

As with walking a tightrope, it is very easy to slip and fall into unwanted territory with social media posts.

Beauty of Social Media

While social media can have many negative effects on an organization and patients, it can also be used for some great things. These are some examples where social media can have a positive impact in the healthcare world:

  • Educate followers with various health tips
  • Maximize exposure of an organizations community contribution
  • Give patients a platform for them to write positive reviews
  • Celebrate the accomplishments of your employees (post with their permission)
  • Announce specials, discounts, or new product

There is so much an organization can do with social media that will have a positive effect. However, social media posting in the healthcare industry is like walking a very fine line. When posting on social media, it is important to have established guidelines and policies in writing. This will enable a healthcare provider to safely post on social media without fear of slipping and falling into unwanted territory.

Be sure to take to have documented training on social media for your employees. They need to know the impact their social media posting can have on patients and on the organization itself. In addition, having documented training will help protect the organization against liability if the need arises to discipline an employee for not following social media policies and procedures.

If done right, having a positive social media presence will be very beneficial to an organization. However, it is important to stay on that narrow rope when posting. It can be very easy to move slightly to one side or the other and fall into unwanted post territory.


For more information about safely posting on social media, please watch the following webinar:




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Monday, April 24, 2017

HCSI Interview with Bruce Blausen of Blausen Medical Episode: 15

Lance King, of HCSI (www.hcsiinc.com) interviewed Bruce Blausen, founder of Blausen Medical.



Bruce Blausen, CEO of Blausen Medical
Personal Life
In this interview, we met Bruce Blausen, founder and CEO of Blausen Medical.  At age 56 he has two sons, ages 13 & 18, and enjoys Bruce tries to take good care of his body by being concious about the little things. He does push-ups during commercial breaks and stays away from processed foods.  Bruce says that when you teach about health, you must be cognizant of food and your own eating habits.

Background
Bruce always wanted to be an architect when he grew up. He was the the best artist in elementary through high school.  While pursuing an architecture degree at Penn State, he spoke to a classmate who was going to be a medical illustrator.  Bruce decided that drawing the human body in 3-D sounded more interesting than drawing buildings in 3-D.  He ended up getting a Master's Degree in Medical Illustration from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.

Medical Illustration and Blausen Medical
Medical Illustration
Most people don't know very much about the medical illustration industry. In fact, most people don't know it's even a profession. There are only 700-1000 medical illustrators in the world.
People might think medical illustration would only be used in textbooks, but in the US, medical illustrations are used in over 20 markets, including libraries, museums, broadcast television, patient education, medical-legal, consumer health websites, and i-phone and android applications.  This industry earnded 110 million dollars this year and is projected to grow to 350 million dollars per year in 5 years.  The biggest growth opportunity is in virtual reality applications (VR).

Blausen Medical
In the late 1990's, Bruce's mother had to have have an angiogram and might have needed angioplasty. She asked him to help her understand it.  He put together a 2 minute vignette on angiograms and angioplasty.  A couple weeks later, she asked about migraines, then a week later asked about glaucoma.  He started to worry about his mother's health until she explained that she was asking for her friends.  At 15-20,000 for 1 min of animation (his usual rate), he realized no one would build high-end medical animations to educate patients and students, but there was a great demand.  He built 50 original animations.  Blausen Medical now has the largest 3-D medical animation library in the world. There are 1500 animations of medical conditions, available in 21 languages for free at www.blausen.com.  Each animation is about 2 minutes long. These animations are medically accurate and are vetted by medical professionals. If there are ever mistakes, Bruce says that users are quick to catch them and notify the company, which fixes them.  It used to be that people would talk to their doctors and then do what they said.  Now everyone searches, wants to learn, wants animations, and don't want to read.  Doctors hate when patients just use Google for healthcare information. Now they can send their patients to Blausen Medical to see animations which are medically accurate.

Future of Blausen Medical
Within the next 3-5 years, students will be able to use an app to scan any text-based document for 1500 key words, which it will highlight. Once those words are highlighted, a user can click a word and see a related animation.  Intel recently funded Blausen to create a skeletal muscle contraction app. It is now regarded as the best VR application for student education.  The company is figuring out how to convert all of its1500 medical animations into VR.  Once available, students/patients can use VR for education by going into a  VR lab, stand inside the illustrations, and move them around, or just by using an app on their phones and a VR device.  Blausen Medical is currently developing an avatar that will act as a healthcare concierge to help you find information and it will be able to know/remember a user's search history.

Failure
Since Blausen Medical began, it has had two total collapses.  Every small company will have great years, average years, and horrible years. When speaking about being an owner/CEO, Bruce said, “If you're not comfortable on your knees, crying and begging God to lift you up, this is probably not the job for you.”  Through failures, Bruce learned that the path to success, like life, is not a straight path and everyone will have highs and lows.  When you're in the lows, you just need to know that you will make it to the highs.  He said, “God will make up the difference.” When Bruce was 19-20 years old, he was asked if he was religious. He said, “Not at all.”  Now, he prays all the time—with children, wife, employees, and a business, he has found that he has to rely on a higher power to direct him.

One Habit That Has Contributed to Success
Bruce says the ability to believe in himself and trust his instinct has greatly affected his success. He says there will always be a group of people who will tell you how to run your business. You need to figure out what is best.  Don't try to live out someone else's dream. Live your dream.  According to Bruce, if you live a normal, quiet life; remove negativity; remove drama; and keep a pure focus, you will have greater levels of success and will have the energy and wisdom to be able to run a business.

Legacy
Bruce's goal for Blausen Medical is to educate 1 billion people worldwide.  It already educates tens of millions per year now.  Just the VA had 1 million views of animations last year.  When people think of great medical illustrators, Da Vinci and Michaelangleo come to mind.  He hopes that when people think of medical animation that Blausen Medical will come to mind.  All people can be elevated through education. He wants to be part of the process.

More Information about Blausen Medical
Please visit www.blausen.com if you want to learn more about the company or just want to learn about medical conditions for yourself or your family.  The majority of people who visit the site are anatomy/physiology instructors and students; the next biggest group of visitors is healthcare providers and patients sent there by doctors. Blausen Medical has provided $48 million worth of animations for free on its website.  Feel free to use it!

Three Absolute Truths
1. God exists.
2. There is an afterlife. Your spirit will go into another dimension.
3. You can always be better, kinder, nicer.  Everything else doesn't matter. Do good and try to please God.  Get better as you go through life.

Entrepreneurship and Change
Over the years, the medical illustration industry has changed. Bruce learned that as an entrepreneur, he had to be aware of technology and the changes that were coming from it. A business must be quick enough to make a decision and adjust direction.

Thanks to  Bruce Blausen for allowing us to interview him!  For more information about Bruce, please see his bio below. And thanks to our listeners/viewers/followers for keeping the Doctor Entrepreneur podcast alive.  Please share with your friends and colleagues and contact Lance King, of Healthcare Compliance Solutions, Inc at www.hcsiin.com for any healthcare compliance needs.

Bio
Bruce Blausen is the founder of Houston-based Blausen Medical, and developer and owner of the world’s largest library of 3D medical animations. Blausen earned a Master of Arts in Medical and Biological Illustration from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. In 1991, he founded Blausen Medical after recognizing the growing commercial and educational need for more accessible methods of illustrating and animating medical processes and functions. Today, Blausen Medical makes its library content available for multiple platforms. The award-winning animation library is now viewed in every country in the world and has been translated in over 21 languages. Blausen’s company and its products have received over 35 honors, including the 2013 Platinum Award for Best Interactive Site and Gold Award for Best Mobile Communications in the eHealthcare Leadership Awards. Blausen Medical has also been honored with numerous Web Health Awards and with an ABBY Award from the Adaptive Business Leaders Organization, for developing innovations that reduce the cost of quality healthcare. In 2014, Mr. Blausen was a recipient of the prestigious Penn State Alumni Fellow Award.



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Monday, April 17, 2017

HCSI Interview with Scott Roethle of World Global Network Episode: 14

In this episode, Lance King of Healthcare Compliance Solutions, Inc (www.hcsiinc.com) interviewed Scott Roethle of World Global Network, distributor of HELO wearable technology, and Medical Director of Lifelog Health.



What Scott Roethle Wishes You Knew About Him
Scott is a private practice anesthesiologist in Kansas City, Kansas.  He is more outgoing and willing to take risks than most people realize.  He says he wishes that most people knew that anesthesiologists don't just “put people to sleep;” they also keep people alive during surgery.  The anesthesiology field is moving towards a peri-operative model, meaning anesthesiologists are now trying to be involved in patient care before, during, and after surgery.  This approach leads to lower recovery times and patients feeling better after surgery.  He's recently gotten frustrated with the healthcare industry because of the sick-care model and has been working to shift the focus to preventative care and wellness.

HELO and World Global Network
Scott and some colleagues were talking about the potential wearables had in the healthcare and wellness industry a little over a year ago.  They all agreed that the current market offerings did not do anything very useful, so they started brainstorming what the perfect wearable device could/would do.  They came up with the HELO device, a wearable health tracking device.
 In the first year, 300,000 HELO devices were sold.  Recently, they upgraded the device in the HELO LX.  This model is able to do the following (the only ambulatory wearable device on the market able to do all of these): monitor heart rate, count steps, measure blood pressure, monitor sleep, read respiration rate, monitor mood and energy level, and conduct a basic ECG test. The HELO LX also has a panic button that users can push to call for emergency response personnel.  Within the next year, the company hopes to release a new model that will also be able to estimate blood glucose levels, blood alcohol, and blood oxygen.
The HELO LX wearable is a product owned by the company World Global Network, which distributes the device through direct sales and online purchasing.  The HELO LX uses BlueTooth technology to upload all the information to LifeLog Health.  Through the app WeCare, family members, healthcare service providers, trainers, wellness coaches and others can access user information.  All of this technology and information-sharing is HIPAA-compliant and secure.  The data is non-identifiable except to the people that the user specifically grants access.  Providers and care-givers with access to the data can continually monitor, periodically download reports, or receive a report directly from the user.  The biggest markets for the device are independent seniors who live alone, employees as part of a corporate wellness program, and people with chronic conditions.  Fitness trainees and commercial drivers are also large potential markets.

More Information
For information on HELO and the distributor opportunity, please visit www.DrScott.Helo.life. To place an order or learn more about World Global Network, you may go to www.DrScott.Worldgn.com.  For health care implementation and/or managed services of the HELO, please see www.LifelogHealth.com.  There are many options available to anyone interested in growing a business or distributing to their patients.  The best way to discover those options would be to talk to Scott.  In addition to his website, he can be reached through LinkedIn and Facebook.

Personal Habits To Which Scott Roethle Attributes His Success  
Scott attributes all success in his life to God.  He has been given gifts from God and he uses those gifts to help others.  He says that he is willing to “go the extra mile,” learn more, do more, and learn from failures.  He says that he has faith that God will get him through failures and that in his life, the most growth has come after failures and disasters.

Three Truths to Being Successful and Fulfilled
First, being successful and being fulfilled are two different things and people need to recognize that.  Being successful is externally driven and being fulfilled in internally driven.  Scott likes to focus more on being fulfilled.
Second, raising good kids is key. Teach them to be appreciative and have a good heart.
Third, do as much as possible to help others. It doesn't have to be huge.  Just touching one life is a great place to start.

Dr. Scott Roethle Professional Bio
Thanks to Dr. Scott Roethle (www.DrScott.Helo.life) for sharing his words of wisdom and telling us about the HELO LX.   His bio is as follows:
-Dr. Roethle has long aspired to participate in disruptive innovation of the healthcare industry, particularly addressing ways to shift the paradigm away from the sick-care model towards helping people maintain health and advance wellness at both the individual and population level.
-He believes strongly in living a healthy, active and balanced lifestyle; and he has competed both as an elite triathlete and as a top-ranked physique competitor. His utmost desire is to help others more easily live and maintain optimal aspects of a healthy, prosperous life.
-His wide-ranging experience and interest outside of the clinical group-practice of anesthesia includes a startup business in disruptive innovation in health technology, marketing the revolutionary new HELO wearable and app available to practitioners and directly to the consumer (www.DrScott.Helo.life). The HELO distribution model allows anyone to earn by referring others to use the HELO, and Dr Roethle is an expert in helping others to earn income from sharing the device and the business opportunity. He serves as Medical Director of Lifelog Health (www.lifeloghealth.com), a managed services consulting company providing health information technology and business infrastructure interface between providers and patients using health smart bands.
-Scott is a highly-qualified physician executive with experience and knowledge in many areas in and outside of the practice of medicine. He is a private practice anesthesiologist partner/owner, with extensive group leadership having served as Vice President and Treasurer, Center Chief, and service line Director. He understands and helped guide the overall corporate strategies of growth and expansion, especially pertaining to financial strategy and market opportunity.
-Dr. Roethle's experience includes serving on corporate advisory boards for health, technology, and wellness companies, as well as holding leadership roles in several local, state and national medical societies and organizations.
 -His Medical Doctorate is from the University of Minnesota, as is his undergraduate degree, a Bachelor of Science in Business from the Carlson School of Management. He completed his anesthesiology residency in the Texas Medical Center in Houston.
-He lives in Leawood, Kansas with his wife of fourteen years and their four children.

Tune In!
Remember to listen to the Doctor Entrepreneur podcast, find us on Facebook (@hcsiinc), and visit our website www.hcsiinc.com.  We appreciate you joining us and sharing with your friends and colleagues!  Contact Lance King with any Healthcare Compliance questions.  He would love to help your practice succeed!



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Friday, April 14, 2017

When Doctors Resist Compliance Training

"No doctor, compliance training is not optional"

We often receive calls from clients asking for creative ways or guidance to get the doctors in their practice to do compliance training along with the rest of the office staff. The doctor doesn't have time or just wants to "review" the policies and procedures, which they won't. This seems to be a fairly common thread with compliance training and doctors.
Many offices have similar issues with doctors resisting training and as a medical office manager or compliance training administrator you may need to be less coddling or creative and more firm and direct. 

The bottom line is that HIPAA, OSHA and Medicare do not simply suggest training. It is REQUIRED that ALL EMPLOYEES receive compliance training annually (including management and particularly doctors). They don’t simply recommend this or say if it is convenient but that it is REQUIRED for compliance.

It may be necessary to send a message reminding ALL staff members of this fact and the importance of being in compliance for the safety of patients and staff, privacy issues, the legal requirements and financial/reputation ramifications for the practice as a whole due to violation or non-compliance.

Including the information on specific regulations may be useful to get the message across. For example:

The HIPAA Privacy CFR discussing administrative requirements for training can be located in 45 CFR § 164.530(b)(1) and for HIPAA Security 45 CFR § 164.308(a)(5).

Similar resources for OSHA can be found on the Guide to Compliance with OSHA Standards for Medical and Dental offices website. Note that each standard requires training.

Medicare and most insurance companies also require attestation (to affirm to be correct, true, or under oath) that ALL staff receives Fraud, Waste and Abuse training to maintain receipt of payment.

As for HR and Employment Law, we were recently contacted by a client about an unemployment claim issue. Because of the Doctor making a poor decision they will likely end up paying that unemployment claim when normally they would have been able to contest it. Due to that doctors lack of HR training, his bad decision will now cost the practice unnecessarily. Please see this previous article that spawned from this incident:
The greatest risk to any organization comes from within.


Another key item of importance is that workforce member can't just read over some notes on policies or procedures and be considered "trained". There needs to be a formalized consistent method of training that includes Documentation of the training processes, dates, etc. As the saying goes, if it isn't documented it didn't happen.

Compliance and Compliance Training is not optional and is very crucial to the legitimacy and success of your practice or medical facility. Make these requirements clear to your Entire Workforce as a fundamental part of your organization's culture and a non-negotiable condition of employment at your practice. End of story!




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Tuesday, April 11, 2017

HCSI Interview with Dr. Jason Scott Earl of the Willes Center for International Entrepreneurship Episode: 13

This episode of Doctor Entrepreneur features an interview with Jason Scott Earl, of the Willes Center for International Entrepreneurship at Brigham Young University Hawaii.  Sponsored by Lance King of Healthcare Compliance Solutions Inc.  www.hcsiinc.com



Introduction/Career Beginnings
Jason Scott Earl wanted to build and create things when he was little because he looked up to his welding father.  He went to school for engineering and worked for Exxon Mobil as a structural engineer.  He learned that to be successful he needed more business knowledge and personal confidence, so after attending corporate assertiveness training, he also went to Tulane University to get an MBA in corporate finance.  He then worked for World Minerals, where he was mentored for 6 months in corporate finance by the CFO.  They spent every Saturday together talking about accounting and finance.  Over a 5 year period, his company acquired about 7 entities and he rose to Director of Strategic Planning and Finance.  Eventually, World Minerals was acquired and he wasn't excited about the changes being made so he became a “reluctant entrepreneur” and started a business with some colleagues.  They created StarStone, LLC, a material science company that made mix designs for concrete to make it stronger and cheaper.  They started licensing out their technology and soon the company was purchased by iCrete.  Jason says that creating and growing his company was like jumping on a bullet bike going 140 mph. He realized that building a successful company didn't have to take 20 years.

Priorities
Through it all Jason has kept one main priority, his family.  They are the main reason why he took his current position at BYU Hawaii--to have more time with family and live in a great place where they can have great experiences together.

He also has a second major priority in life, his students.  Teaching made Jason realize that there's a much bigger world that he can influence.  Plus, helping students accomplish great things has been rewarding.  He enjoys seeing them build businesses in their home countries/locations.

Jason says to pick 3-4 things that are important and stick to them.  If you do, it will lead to success and happiness.  For example, exercise, spend time with family, and do something that seems hard.  Jason's family has chosen to read together daily at 6:00 AM.  He said at first it was really difficult, but after 2 months, it was just something they did every day.

Failures
Throughout his career, Jason has learned from failure. When something fails, he says that you have two choices.  Double down and try to save it, or realize it's not going to work and cut your losses. The right choice may not always be apparent.

Jason was failing at his first position and knew there was a good chance of getting fired.  He entered assertiveness training and learned that he could just state what he needed and that people would respect it.  He was more successful because he had a failure and fixed the problem.

Another time, Jason was working on getting his Professional Engineer license in California. He already had the certification in Louisiana, but he had to take the exam again when he moved to California.  It was a long test-- 12 hrs/day for 2 days.  He got the results back and had failed by one point.  He then appealed for a higher score and they ended up lowering the score.  He took this as a sign that he needed to look at a different career path.

Entrepreneurship    
He thinks the world's perspective on entrepreneurship is totally wrong.  Most of us think of outgoing, charismatic, bigger-than-life people when we think of successful entrepreneurs.  Jason challenges that paradigm.  He said, “Entrepreneurship is the ability to find and recognize opportunities and take action.” It's not always glamorous and it's not an inborn skill. Anyone who wants to can learn this skill, and once it has been learned, there will be no stopping you.  Jason works with students from 70 different countries. Learning about entrepreneurship might not change the whole world, but it changes the student's world. In his class, students start a project, create a business model, and test it out in their home countries.  For example, recently a group of students from Tuvalu, Mexico, Tonga, Hawaii, and Idaho went to Tuvalu and set up hydroponics gardens and taught people to garden without soil.  Because of rising ocean water, the soil is salty and crops won't grow in salty soil.  Locals are now growing their own food that they previously had to import from Fiji.  Hydroponics is not glamorous, it's not an app, it's definitely not social media, but it works!  The group then went to Tonga to set up an eco-adventure tourism company.  Videos of these projects can be seen on the I Love BYU Hawaii Facebook group page.  Jason says the best way to learn is through a master/apprentice program, and the second best way is simulation, so his classes involve a lot of simulation work, too.

Legacy
When asked what legacy he hopes to leave, Jason said he hopes people don't remember his name.  He doesn't want to leave a legacy.  “People do crazy dumb things in name of legacy,” according to Jason.  He does hope that his students begin thousands of start-ups and that those generate jobs and opportunities for many people.  He says that more people need to have the perspective of helping individuals instead of leaving a legacy of a 10 million-dollar building.

Three Truths to Live By
One: People need to think of their life as a simulation.  There's going to come a point where you see your decisions and the consequences of those decisions.  And you'll see what would have happened if you chose differently.  Choose wisely!

Two: Who really matters to you is more important than anything. People don't care about your success story or your money, but they do care if you care about them.

Three: This life goes by quickly. Most of us will be dead before we know it.  We should be doing everything we can to teach the rising generation.

Advice for Doctor Entrepreneurs
Jason says to think about differentiation.  What makes you different?  Is it true competitive advantage; is it sustainable? How do you make that known to people?
In the case of doctors, there is a huge opportunity to combine different fields. Answer these questions: who are my competitors and how am I different?  Then find a small market and dominate it.

Questions?
Jason can be reached at JasonScottEarl.com or jasonscottearl@gmail.com.

Thank you for listening/watching!  Please follow Lance King and Healthcare Compliance Solutions Inc on Facebook @hcsiinc, listen to the Doctor Entrepreneur podcast, and/or watch more interviews on our YouTube Channel.  www.hcsiinc.com


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Monday, April 3, 2017

HCSI Interview with Dr. Jonathan Smith of Healthier is Wealthier Episode: 12

In this episode, Lance King of Healthcare Compliance Solutions, Inc (www.hcsiinc.com) interviews Jonathan Smith, MD, founder of Healthier is Wealthier.



Dr. Jonathan Smith Background
Dr. Jonathan Smith grew up in Cape Town, South Africa.  When he was a boy, his parents gave him a choice: to become an engineer like his father, or to become a medical doctor.  He remembered the promise he made as a Boy Scout to help other people and knew he  would be happiest helping other people, so he chose to be a doctor.  After graduating medical school in Cape Town, he had some interesting experiences working in a hospital in Zimbabwe, a few of which he shared in the interview.  The most important thing he learned while working in Zimbabwe was that “What the mind of man can conceive and believe, it can achieve.”

Dr. Smith Career
After his time in Zimbabwe, Dr. Smith went back to Cape Town, where he was studying to become a surgeon.  After three years, he realized that he was dissatisfied with that line of study.  The Chief of Surgery advised him to look into anesthesiology.  Dr. Smith did so and never looked back!  After 40 years in the field, he never lost a patient nor was sued.
 Additionally, during his time as an anesthesiologist, he discovered two toxic components in anesthetics and was instrumental in having them removed from use.  Eventually, Dr. Smith ended up in Southern California, where he decided to attend business school.  He graduated with an MBA in 2010 from California Miramar University.  Business school expanded Dr. Smith's view from helping one person at a time (treating one patient) to helping many people stay healthy.  Jonathan found his true passion in fighting the epidemic of obesity.

Healthier is Wealthier
In 2011, Jonathan created Healthier is Wealthier, based on the idea that if people can stay healthy, they can save the money they would have otherwise spent on healthcare.  Healthier is Wealthier is a consulting company that promotes wellness in the workplace.  According to www.healthieriswealthier.com, “75% of all chronic illness can be relieved or cured (No more medication need) by attention to four areas – cessation of smoking, exercise, food content and portion control, and stress relief.”  Jonathan likens our bodies to automobiles; we need to have good fuel (food), carry a lightened load (maintain healthy weight), and do preventative maintenance (measure data and follow corrective action).  When Healthier is Wealthier is hired to help with employee wellness, Dr. Smith first analyzes employees with two special medical devices that measure things like temperature, heart rate, oxygen levels, and most importantly, vascular resistance (which gives an indication of stress).  After analyzing the data, Dr. Smith and his team come up with individualized courses of action, and employees are given 6 months to work the plan.  Then results are again measured and Dr. Smith will do a follow-up consultation.

Basic Ideas of Health and Wellness
Dr. Smith lives by some basic ideas of health and wellness. First, feed your body good food; second, maintain health with exercise; third, reduce stress and get enough sleep.  Dr. Smith has a team of nutritionists and exercise experts that can build individualized programs for you and/or your team, but the main principles are found below.

Nutrition
Dr. Smith's basic nutrition plan is fairly simple: cut carbohydrates; eat whole, real foods; and stay hydrated.  He says that by maintaining a caloric ratio of 50% healthy/essential fats, 30% healthy protein, and 20% low glycemic index carbohydrates people will be at their pinnacle of wellness.

Exercise
His exercise plan is simple as well: he recommends that most individuals try to move for 3 minutes for every 60 minutes of sitting, which means about 30 minutes of moving per day.  He says that if you want to run a marathon, then build up slowly and don't overdo it.  He doesn't believe in “bone-breaking” high-intensity workouts.  He found that 1 in 5 people whom he scanned at a cross-fit gym had cardiac problems, he believes due to the strenuous work of cross-fit.

Stress reduction/Adequate Sleep
Many stress-related problems can be addressed by getting enough sleep.  Dr. Smith says this is easy to measure; just ask, “Am I getting enough sleep?” If not, get more!

More Information
To learn more about the services Healthier is Wealthier offers or to listen to Dr. Smith's advice, please contact Dr. Jonathan Smith on Facebook @docspeak, visit www.healthieriswealthier.com or www.docspeaks.info, or find his podcast or YouTube channel under Jonathan Smith, MD.  Anyone who has the need and desire to change can be helped by Dr. Smith.  He says that he can only help those who want to change.  He is committed to this program and he is the example he expects people to follow.  People need to change their eating, sleeping, and exercise habits and then they will change their lives.  Dr. Smith wants people to know that he truly cares about health and longevity. He fully intends to live to be 100 and wants to bring as many people to that age with him as possible!

Final Advice
Dr. Jonathan Smith's final advice is to be happy, be healthy, and be smart.  He embodies these three ideals and it was fun to get to know him better in this interview.  Make sure to watch or listen to the entire show to get all the stories he shared with us.


Thank you for reading/watching/listening to our show.  Follow us on Facebook @hcsiinc to see more interviews and other helpful advice for doctor entrepreneurs.  Healthcare Compliance Solutions, Inc www.hcsiinc.com


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Friday, March 31, 2017

Your Biggest Liability Is Standing Right Next To You

The greatest risk to any organization comes from within

Donna felt confident that she had terminated Kate's employment with just cause. Within a week of Kate's firing, Donna received notice that Kate filed for unemployment insurance. Donna was surprised with the news. Kate was let go because she was doing something that was against company policy. She was, in the eyes of the organization, steeling and falsifying documentation. Donna thought that not doing these things was simply common sense. During Donna's conversation with the unemployment representative, he asked her a question that stunned her. He asked, "do you have documentation that you trained Kate in these matters?" Donna's reply was very similar to how many others might have replied in her situation, "why would I need to do training on something that is common sense?" Kate began receiving unemployment benefits.

An organization relies on its employees and their productivity. Close relationships are sometimes formed. Even the occasional lifetime friendship is created. Employees are one of the greatest resources to an organization. It is for all of the reasons listed above, and many others, that an organizations biggest liability comes from its employees.

Yes, the statement above is cold and harsh, but so are certain workplace realities. Employees present the biggest risk to an organization. Here are some examples where employees are a liability:
  • Compliance (HIPAA, Medicare, etc) - Employees are human and sometimes their curiosity gets the better of them. They also tend to say or do things that could get an organization in trouble or audited.
  • Harassment - Employees have a bad history of being mean and spiteful to each other. If an employee enters a department where they are either not liked or resented, the other employees will make the unwanted employee's work environment unbearable until they are no longer there.
  • Social Media - People love to vent their frustrations. As it turns out, people now have a way to vent their frustrations about their jobs to the entire world. Employees of any organization are no different. If an employee feels slighted at their job or does not like their job, the world will hear about it.
  • Employment Termination - There is always a level of risk when an organization has to terminate an employees employment. Although the supervisor feels that he or she did everything right, there are times when something unexpected comes back to bite the organization right in the bank account. Here are two facts to remember: 1. some employees will lie and 2. unemployment officers and the courts tend to lean in favor of the employee (particularly if the employer has little or no documentation to back up their side of the story and it boils down to a "he said, she said" situation).
What has been said here is just a taste of reality. However, with that reality, there are things an organization can do to lessen its liability:
  • Training and Documentation - It is vital that an organization deliver training on every topic that is relevant to that organization. No matter how trivial it might appear. Do not assume that people will just know stuff because it's "common sense". In addition, it is critical that there is documentation of any given training. Include the names of the attendees, date, and the topics covered.
  • Policies and Procedures - Having established, written, and communicated policies and procedures will help an organization protect itself from employees who claim that they had no idea this or that was against the organization's policies. Having written policies and procedures will also protect an organization if an audit should occur.
  • Organizational Culture - What does the culture within an organization say about it? For employees, the culture of an organization says a lot. Having an organizational culture where the employees are supportive of one another, where there is a positive attitude, and where new ideas and thoughts are free to flow, helps lessen negative attitudes and bad feelings within the organization. It helps to bring in the right type of person who would fit the culture within an organization.
  • Employment Termination - This goes back to the idea of having effective policies, procedures and documentation in place. For example, if an employee quits, do not ask him or her to come back to the office to train another employee. When an employee quits, there IT access should be cut and they should not be doing any more work for an organization. This should be a written policy and followed the same way every time. Avoid showing favoritism towards employees and be sure that managers/supervisors know to avoid getting too close and personal with their employees. Managers and Supervisors should stay objective and focused on developing the employees in order to help them become more valuable within the organization.
Employees are a vital component to the success of an organization. Your employees will have diverse backgrounds, skills and personalities. However, they are still employees of an organization. Any organization who looses sight of this fact is putting itself at risk.

Organizations should treat their employees well and give them every opportunity to succeed in their position of employment. However, it is up to the organization to protect itself from the liability that comes with employees being imperfect people.



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Monday, March 27, 2017

HCSI Interview with Vishaal Virani of Doctorpreneurs: Episode 11

Lance King of Healthcare Compliance Solutions, Inc (www.hcsiinc.com) interviewed Vishaal Virani, co-founder and strategy director of Doctorpreneurs.com.



Background
As a child, Vishaal imagined playing cricket professionally when he grew up.  As a teenager, his dreams became more down to earth.  He knew he loved helping people so he chose to go to medical school.  Soon after graduating from UCL Medical School in London in 2011.  He became a member of Doctorpreneurs, which was started by Claire Novorol in 2011, and was excited for the networking opportunities it provided.  When Claire expressed concern that this organization was becoming too much for her to handle, Vishaal and some of his colleagues decided to re-launch the Doctorpreneurs website.

Doctorpreneurs
This new version of Doctorpreneurs, which Vishaal and his co-founders dubbed Doctorpreneurs 2.0, expanded the original idea to include a newsletter, job and internship listings, and networking and entrepreneurial events as well as a website with interviews of successful doctor entrepreneurs, blog articles, a resource center with book listings, videos, education resources, etc.
 Vishaal said that the majority of doctors don't understand that they are entrepreneurs.  What he wants people to realize is that doctors have a desire to solve a problem; entrepreneurs work the same way.  A quote by Vishaal on the Doctorpreneurs website says, “It’s easier to teach a doctor business than to teach a businessman medicine. Doctors posses a unique skill set to make invaluable contributions to the healthcare startup world, so what are you waiting for?”   If anyone would like to join, search resources, or view job opportunities, you are invited to visit www.doctorpreneurs.com.  You can also find them on twitter and LinkedIn, or email info@doctorpreneurs.com.

Due to technical difficulties, this interview was cut short.  We hope you find the show notes helpful! Thanks for watching/listening/reading!  Sponsored by Healthcare Compliance Solutions, Inc. www.hcsiinc.com  Find us on Facebook (@hcsiinc) for more interviews and other resources for healthcare professionals.



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Monday, March 20, 2017

HCSI Interview with Dr. Michael Dolby of Practice in Your Pocket: Episode 10

Practice in Your Pocket Interview with Michael Dolby; conducted by Lance King of Healthcare Compliance Solutions Inc www.hcsiinc.com

Dr. Michael Dolby Background
Dr. Michael Dolby dreamed of being an architect as a child and teenager. When he entered Boise State University to play football, the coached told him it was too demanding of a degree and he needed to change his major to business, which he did.  After business school, Michael got a sales job and was excelling to the point that his sales manager told him to basically find another job because he was making the rest of the team look bad. When Michael expressed his frustrations to his dad about his job, his dad recommended that he go to dental school.
Michael enrolled in the required science classes at Boise State for a year and a half and then was accepted to dental school at Pacific University, which condensed 4 years of academic work into 3 calendar years. He then went on to complete a residency at St. Joseph's in Denver, Colorado.  Through some chance encounters, he bought a thriving practice from a dentist in Boise, where he has resided and practiced ever since.



Dental Practice Advice
The first thing a newly-practicing dentist should do is develop a vision for the practice, and then create an actionable plan to realize that vision.  Michael's best advice is to assemble a team that fully supports that vision and then empower team members to help build and create that vision.  Allow team members to speak freely and remember that everyone is on one team.  Michael said, “Practices cannot take off without teams that support them.”  He noted that a dentist taking over an existing practice has an added hurdle of having current team members buy-in to the new vision and plan. Michael says that in this case, the vision should be implemented slowly. Give team members a chance to decide if they want to be part of the new culture and allow them to leave if they don't.
When Michael first began, he realized that business school was the best thing he had done to ensure having a successful dental practice. He noticed that other dentists struggled with the practice management aspect of owning a dental office.  He saw many good dentists failing because they didn't understand the business side of their practices.  He first worked with a company called Fortune Management, which helped dentists create visions and plans to fulfill that vision. Michael realized that although the company did a lot of good, it lacked the tools dentists needed.  Michael decided to create a software application specifically for dental practice management--Practice in Your Pocket.

Practice in Your Pocket
Michael developed Practice in Your Pocket, along with his team at his dental practice, to fill the holes that he saw in current practice management applications.  The biggest problem with all other practice management solutions is that the reports they generate are difficult for dentists and their teams to understand.  Practice in Your Pocket (PIYP) automatically takes the data collected and populates that information into a personal dashboard with information like collections, new patients, and production by doctor and by hygenist.  Those fields are available to all team members so everyone can track success.  The doctor also has access to overhead numbers to track costs.  PIYP auto syncs with Quickbooks and Excel; it also syncs with Dentrix and will be able to sync with Eaglesoft by the end of the summer.  PIYP also creates morning and monthly meetings notes so that team members can track what was covered and know what will be covered in the next meeting.
The most important part of Practice in Your Pocket is the TLC calling feature, which facilitates personal calls to patients from the dentist or other team member. This feature lists the patient, procedure, and phone number. It also allows the dentist to schedule follow-up calls for patients who are experiencing problems.  Michael says that making these TLC calls is the best thing a practice can do to keep current patients and get patient referrals.   At the end of the day, he calls every patient that he worked on that day.  He said PIYP gives hygienists the ability to call their patients at the end of the day, too.   Michael says the 15 minutes it takes to make those calls is the most important part of his day in maintaining a successful business.
A dentist who would like to learn more about Practice in Your Pocket may visit www.piyp.com.  The company also has a YouTube channel with videos that take a more in-depth look at their product.  Just search Practice in Your Pocket.  A demo may be scheduled by calling 800 213-0252.  Soon the demo will be available on the website.  Practice in Your Pocket offers a 30-day free trial on their website, as well.

Dr. Michael Dolby's Advice and Legacy
Dr. Dolby would like new dentists to know that being a dentist can be a challenging job, both mentally and physically. He knows it can be easy to get caught up in all the things you have to do; he wants people to remember to stop and be grateful for the great things in their lives--to take time to recognize that God has blessed them with the skills and ability to be a dentist and He has also blessed them with patients that put their trust and faith in those skills and abilities. When we are grateful, we can't be unhappy so don't get caught up in the negativity.  He says the truths he lives by are: be honest with yourself; operate with absolute integrity; choose to be happy and take time to recognize your blessings.  He hopes that his team remembers his passion for creating a positive place to work, that his patients know he tried to create a safe place for them, and that his family knows he worked hard for them.

Sponsored by Healthcare Compliance Solutions Inc www.hcsiinc.com

Make sure to watch all of our videos for more interviews like this one!



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Thursday, March 16, 2017

Policies and Procedures, Compliance Training and HR

Maintaining Compliance and also Keeping HR in the Loop
 HCSI
In your ongoing efforts to provide an office culture of compliance, it is important to remember that HIPAA requires covered entities to establish and implement written policies and procedures that are consistent with its Privacy and Security Rules.  It can also be important for your Human Resource officer(s) to be involved with HIPAA compliance related issues in the business.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office for Civil Rights (“OCR”) has begun its Phase 2 HIPAA Audit Program.  The Program will focus on the policies and procedures adopted and employed by covered entities and their business associates to meet the requirements of the Privacy, Security, and Breach Notification Rules.  Furthermore, if a group health plan is selected for an audit, it would have a very short time to produce its policies and procedures (i.e., 10 business days).  If the group health plan does not comply (for example, because it does not have policies and procedures), the OCR will likely impose corrective measures which could include costly civil monetary penalties.

HIPAA policies and procedures have important functions, including but not limited to:
  • Limiting uses and disclosures of Protected Health Information (“PHI”) to the minimum amount reasonably necessary to achieve the purpose of the use or disclosure;
  • Identifying the workforce members who need access to PHI and electronic PHI (“e-PHI”) to carry out their duties, the categories of PHI that they need, and any conditions under which they need the PHI to do their jobs;
  • Ensuring appropriate protection of e-PHI when it is transferred, removed, disposed and electronic media is re-used; and
  • Ensuring that e-PHI is not improperly altered or destroyed.
However, it is not sufficient for a covered entity to merely adopt its HIPAA policies and procedures.  The health practice office must also:
  • Designate a privacy and security official to develop and implement policies and procedures; 
  • Train applicable workforce members on its policies and procedures as necessary for them to carry out their functions, and apply appropriate sanctions against workforce members who violate its policies and procedures;
  • Periodically assess how well its policies and procedures meet the requirements of the Security Rule; and
  • Designate a contact person responsible for receiving complaints and providing individuals with information on the covered entity’s privacy practices.
There is no template for HIPAA policies and procedures.  Instead employers have the flexibility to design policies and procedures that are appropriate for their size, organizational structure, and risks to PHI and e-PHI.  Furthermore, as employers evolve, so should their policies and procedures.  For example, if an employer adopts a telework policy, it may wish to review whether its policies and procedures appropriately address issues involving remote access.


Summarizing, although not a new requirement, due to new technologies, evolving business and regulatory practices, along with impending HHS audits, employers may want to review their HIPAA policies and procedures to make sure that they are compliant and up-to-date. Many HIPAA policies inherently overlap with Human Resource's duties: training, disciplinary actions and employee health information for examples.
The increase in audits — combined with everything from changes in technology, the addition of a health and wellness program and concerns about hacking — serve as a good reminder why employers should revisit HIPAA training often and collaborate with HR to ensure compliance.

Many of the employers facing fines are healthcare providers, health plans or healthcare clearinghouses (organizations considered as covered entities under HIPAA). But most HR professionals also handle protected health information (PHI) to some extent, which puts them in danger of violating the HIPAA Privacy Rule.

Employers should have a written policy in place about how they handle PHI and designate PHI handlers and a HIPAA privacy officer. The policy should outline what types of information are considered PHI and how employers may and may not use it. It should also include a procedure for handling complaints and a process for employees to file them if they think their privacy rights are being violated.

Employees who may handle PHI should be trained on the dos and don’ts of handling protected health information, especially as it relates to electronic information. It’s vital for the HR team to understand the implications of handling PHI in emails, storing it on the cloud, or communicating about it over other electronic formats. And when discussing matters containing PHI with an employee, it’s important to have a signed HIPAA authorization form for the release of employee health information.

Lastly, the HIPAA privacy officer should review compliance documents and ensure that agreements with vendors who handle PHI, called “business associate agreements,” are up to date. The federal government considers vendors and subcontractors to be business associates if they handle PHI on behalf of the covered entity.

Source(s): http://www.hhs.com, http://www.jdsupra.comhttps://www.benefitnews.com, http://www.hcsiinc.com


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Monday, March 13, 2017

HCSI Interview with Jim Dahle of White Coat Investor: Episode 9

This show features an interview with James (Jim) Dahle, author of the book The White Coat Investor, and editor of whitecoatinvestor.com, a financial advice blog for doctors.  The interview was conducted by Lance King of Healthcare Compliance Solutions Inc-- www.hcsiinc.com



Jim Dahle Background
Jim Dahle went to medical school for the same reason most other healthcare professionals do—because he liked science and loved helping people.  He did his residency in emergency medicine and continues to practice in that field.  He was never really interested in business or finance until he had been ripped off by many financial services professionals, including a realtor, an investment advisor, and a lender.  He decided he needed to learn enough to protect himself from predatory practices.

White Coat Investor
Jim began learning about financial matters through reading books at a local used book store and the library.  He found that many books weren't very good and almost none were written specifically for healthcare professionals.  From the few good books on the subject, he learned the basics of finance—investing, saving for retirement, obtaining loans, etc.  He realized most other doctors lacked the same information he had, so he began sharing his new knowledge first with friends, and then with others
through a blog.  Next, he decided to self-publish a book on Amazon, which he marketed through his blog and virtual book tours.  Currently, he has a website, Podcast, blog, and his book is a best-seller.  Jim has found that some people who won't read a blog will read a book, and some people who won't read a book will listen to a podcast.  Most of his readers/followers are medical/dental students, newly-practicing doctors, and older practicing physicians.  He is looking to expand into a YouTube channel, online course, and possibly a medical school course.  He is hoping to “meet people where they are” through all these different media channels so he can spread the word to all practicing professionals.

Advice
The best advice that Jim has been given was from medical school: “Do the right thing for the patient.”  This phrase is applicable for anyone—Do the right thing for the customer, patient, investor, etc.  He says that if you do the right thing, people will trust you and keep using your services.   Jim defines entrepreneurship as “building something not just for the money but because you want to contribute something to the world that doesn't yet exist.”  He enjoys being a doctor because he is a helper; he enjoys running White Coat Investor because it is gratifying to “help the helpers,” as he put it. This is his way of giving back to people like him, in the hopes that they don't have to go through the hard knocks that he did to learn what he knows now.

Contact
For more information, Jim can be contacted at editor@whitecoatinvestor.com.  He enjoys all the positive feedback he receives because of his book and blog.  You can buy his book The White Coat Investor at Amazon.com, you can find his blog at www.whitecoatinvestor.com, where you may also subscribe to his monthly newsletter.  His podcast is also available on iTunes and you can follow him on twitter @wcinvestor.  Watch his website for more ways to connect coming soon!

Thank you for watching! Make sure to check out Healthcare Compliance Solutions Inc website at www.hcsiinc.com.


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